Monthly Archives: April 2019

TTO Knee Surgery: 4 Weeks Post Op

Background: Prior to my surgery I found little information available online. Below is a journal of my experience. My list of logs can be found here.

I had a tibial tubercle osteotomy (TTO) with distal realignment procedure. My procedure also included a lateral release. And my effected knee is the right.

4 Weeks Post Op (Fri): Allowed to walk-kind of

Today was a day of milestones. I returned to work, so there was that strain, and at physical therapy I was approved to practice walking. I still have to hold on to the crutches, both of them, but I am allowed to unlock the brace, so my knee can bend. I am to walk, putting weight on the leg as tolerated, and go through the motion of walking, concentrating on a heal toe motion. I also got promoted to bending the knee to 90 degrees, which I did with no problem. Same goes for the practice of walking, but I am going to limit practicing that, because the knee was a bit sore in the evening.

My long scar started puffing a bit, so I am putting silicone pads on it to keep it flat. The knee still swells so I’m wearing either a wrap or the compression sleeve.

Of note, on Monday, I started doing the laying leg lifts without the brace, to practice getting the balance down.

(Tibial tubercle osteotomy (TTO) with distal realignment procedure, the tibial tubercle, the prominent bony insertion of the patellar tendon into your shinbone (tibia), is partially or totally detached and moved and reattached in a better position that allows the kneecap to track better in its groove)

*I am not a doctor nor am I qualified to give medical advice. I am simply sharing what I experienced. The content on my blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this Website.

 

Advertisements

TTO Knee Surgery: 5-7 Days Post

Background: Prior to my surgery I found little information available online. Below is a journal of my experience. My list of logs can be found here.

I had a tibial tubercle osteotomy (TTO) with distal realignment procedure. My procedure also included a lateral release. And my effected knee is the right.

Days 5-7 post op (Tues-Thurs): Quitting the Oxy

At this point the pain wasn’t as bad, and I was curious if I’d feel the same without the narcotic pain killers. I’d been on half a pill every 4-6 hours for a few days.  I wanted to switch to OTC drugs.  I took one at 11am and thought I’d sleep through the withdrawals that start 12 hrs later. Yeah, that backfired. I hadn’t bathed in three days, so I felt dirty and it just kept bothering me. I was hot, then cold, then hot. So I finally took a half a pill at two in the morning. This way the withdrawals started at two in the afternoon and through the evening. It was rough going, but I took no drugs all day, minus the oxy at two am, and a Tylenol at 11am. The pain didn’t seem any worse without the drugs.

By all means, don’t be like me if you are still in pain. I quit the pain killers earlier than most. Even my doctor was shocked when I had my 2 week check up and was off everything. But when you do stop, this should give you a good idea of possible withdrawals, depending how much you were taking.

I was also able at this point to get up on my own. Whether in and out of bed, off the couch, and so forth. I could lift the leg normally, no more dragging it. So I regained most independence, and no more dizzying drugs.

 

  Current photo, and yes, the yellow is bruising.

(Tibial tubercle osteotomy (TTO) with distal realignment procedure, the tibial tubercle, the prominent bony insertion of the patellar tendon into your shinbone (tibia), is partially or totally detached and moved and reattached in a better position that allows the kneecap to track better in its groove)

*I am not a doctor nor am I qualified to give medical advice. I am simply sharing what I experienced. The content on my blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this Website.


TTO Knee Surgery: 4 Days Post Op

Background: Prior to my surgery I found little information available online. Below is a journal of my experience. My list of logs can be found here.

I had a tibial tubercle osteotomy (TTO) with distal realignment procedure. My procedure also included a lateral release. And my effected knee is the right.

Day four post op (Monday): First shower and first PT session

First time leaving the house since surgery. I took an oxy before we left, as advised. Just made me dizzy for the car drive, in my opinion. The therapy lady adjusted my crutches and how I was using them. She didn’t like how slouched I was. She took measurements of my swelling, and did some EMS (electronic muscle stimulation) therapy followed by ice. The only movements I was told to do, was leg lifts while standing, to the front and both sides. I was to build up to doing three sets of ten. I wasn’t able to do this until Thursday, which was her goal, to be able to do by the time I came back. (I go in Mondays and Fridays) I opted to do them when I went to the bathroom, and held the counter for balance. That way I wasn’t getting up extra, since getting up was such a pain and most times a struggle to do on my own.

At this point I am non weight baring, and not to bend the leg at all.

So by this day I was feeling pretty grimy. I ordered some wipes made for hands and face, the non alcohol type. But those only keep you feeling fresh for so long. So, every bathroom is different. I get that. What worked for us may not work for you. But… in case it might. Here is what we did.

A larger cooler, like the kind you’d put drinks in for the beach, but not with wheels. But really anything that is level with the sides of the tub and big enough for you to sit on, will work. Sit that in the tub, throw a towel on it for comfort. Sit on it, with your bad leg extended out of the tub and onto the toilet, which mine happens to be next to. If you have room, you could put a chair there or something. This allowed us to keep the leg in the brace and out of the tub. We still taped a trash bag around it, using painters tape. And the shower has a hose, so we were able to hold it where needed. It wasn’t perfect and I wasn’t a fan, but it minimized my threat of falling while in the tub, and kept everything dry.

Here’s a pic of the set up.

And an image of my leg at this point.

(Tibial tubercle osteotomy (TTO) with distal realignment procedure, the tibial tubercle, the prominent bony insertion of the patellar tendon into your shinbone (tibia), is partially or totally detached and moved and reattached in a better position that allows the kneecap to track better in its groove)

*I am not a doctor nor am I qualified to give medical advice. I am simply sharing what I experienced. The content on my blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this Website.


TTO Knee Surgery: 1-3 Days Post Op

Background: Prior to my surgery I found little information available online. Below is a journal of my experience. My list of logs can be found here.

I had a tibial tubercle osteotomy (TTO) with distal realignment procedure. My procedure also included a lateral release. And my effected knee is the right.

1st Day Post Op (Friday): A Day of Pain

This was the worse day, pain wise. I was pretty much crying and miserable the entire day. My dose was doubled on the narcotic pain killer, I was given Oxycodone with Acetaminophin. But it barely helped. I moved as little as possible, tried to hydrate and mostly just sobbed. I refused to stay in bed all day and still moved to the couch, ate some meals, and tried to maintain a normal cycle of being awake and sleeping. But I was really drugged. So be prepared for this to be the worse day. During the night, I was using the bathroom a lot, to get all the fluids out of me from the surgery. Peeing was also hard, side effect from the drugs they gave me and the oxy.

Lifting my leg caused pain, like a tugging near the surgery site. Whether my imagination or not, it felt like the bone they cut was being torn off every time I used my muscles to lift my leg. Which I needed to do when using the crutches. So after enduring this pain for longer than it should have taken me to figure out, I realized I could drag my leg behind me instead of picking it up. I put socks on that foot to make it more slide-able, and just dragged it. This let those muscles relax and I was able to move in a much more pain free manner. I did this for the first three days, until I could lift that leg without feeling the pulling. Granted this only works indoors, but that was where I was spending most of my time, so it worked fine.

2nd day Post Op (Saturday) we were allowed to remove all the wrappings from the leg. Images below.

I bought regular wipes for use until I was able to bathe. I wiped the leg down when we unwrapped it. I didn’t get the disinfectant wipes, just normal hand wipes. They aren’t baby wipes, but those would work. It was easier than trying to take a sponge bathe. And it ensured the incision site was kept dry.

The pain was better on day 2 and 3, but I still kept up on the heavy dose of pain killers.

Of note, how I did the toilet and sitting general. My left leg was strong enough to support me in a squat, and I would slide the right leg out, keeping a sock on it. The first few days, my husband also lifted my leg onto a short stool, so the foot was off the ground. Since having it low, made it hurt more. By post op day four, I was leaving it on the ground, but it was also easier to pee because I had less drugs in me. I also found it was easier to take my left leg (good leg) out of the shorts/panties so I could spread my legs farther part. The brace makes it hard to separate my legs while having the pant leg on.

(Tibial tubercle osteotomy (TTO) with distal realignment procedure, the tibial tubercle, the prominent bony insertion of the patellar tendon into your shinbone (tibia), is partially or totally detached and moved and reattached in a better position that allows the kneecap to track better in its groove)

*I am not a doctor nor am I qualified to give medical advice. I am simply sharing what I experienced. The content on my blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this Website.


TTO Knee Surgery: Day of Surgery

Background: Prior to my surgery I found little information available online. Below is a journal of my experience. My list of logs can be found here.

I had a tibial tubercle osteotomy (TTO) with distal realignment procedure. My procedure also included a lateral release. And my effected knee is the right. Image above is from the night after surgery.

Day of Surgery (Thursday): Out patient procedure

My appointment/arrival was for 1130am. The person ahead of me canceled, so as soon as we arrived, they were lining up to get the vitals and IV in. I was taken back for surgery at 1pm. So for those curious, yes it is a full strip, and I would suggest wearing shorts that will be above the brace, so short shorts. And if you are like me, you won’t be able to reach your foot that is in the brace, because you have to keep it fully extended. So wear slip on shoes, and some socks. They sent me home with the shoe in a bag.

Before surgery they gave me something to dry out my lungs. This gives you really bad dry mouth. I don’t know if all hospitals do this, but mine did. This plays in later. I was put under pretty fast once they wheeled me back, mask went on, I took three deep breathes, and felt an intense burn in my left arm. Then I was out.

When I woke, pain. Like, omg, the pain. I opened my eyes just enough to utter that I was in pain. I was given half a dose of something in the IV. They came back later, who knows how much later, and I repeated I was in pain, so I was given the rest of the dose. This was repeated with another drug, given half, complained, given the other half. Really the pain never got better. But they gave up on making me comfortable, or my time expired, so they wheeled me back to the original room, where my husband waited.

Here they wouldn’t give me IV drugs. Had to be oral, and I had to prove I could keep them down. Well, I was dizzy of course, and mentioned being nauseous. So they wouldn’t give me the pain pill until I ate some crackers. Remember the dry mouth? Yeah. So eating that cracker was impossible. I asked for soda, thinking that might work better, it didn’t. Somehow I got one cracker down and they gave me the pill. We waited a bit, it stayed down and they blessed me to get dressed and leave. We were out there by six or seven and home before nine that night. (Had to go to the pharmacy for prescriptions)

Getting in the car… I went for the back seat. Went in the passenger side, since its my right leg, so that leg could be up on the seats and my good leg down. Exiting, I’ve tried continuing to scoot and go out the driver’s side, or scooting back to the passenger side. I’d say stick with the same door you went in. Its also better if you can put the leg on the center console instead of the seat next to you. But that depends on the driver and style of car.

I did throw up on the drive home, but that’s normal for me. I think I’ve done that after every surgery. I was able to eat once we got home and get into bed. My husband lifted the leg for me that was in the brace. So if you have someone who can do this for you, do it. Eventually you can grab the brace and lift it yourself, but it depends on how strong your abs are.

(Day of surgery for tibial tubercle osteotomy (TTO) with distal realignment procedure, the tibial tubercle, the prominent bony insertion of the patellar tendon into your shinbone (tibia), is partially or totally detached and moved and reattached in a better position that allows the kneecap to track better in its groove)

*I am not a doctor nor am I qualified to give medical advice. I am simply sharing what I experienced. The content on my blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this Website.