Tag Archives: dystopian novel

Dragons and Healers: Enukara Book One

New release!! First in my Enukara Book Series featuring shape shifting dragons!

The dragons came to earth seeking an Enukara. The invasion was silent, taking decades to unfold. The first generation was smarter than humans, sent to befriend, learn, and study the local inhabitants. They crippled Earth’s technology with minimal effort. The second generation were the foot soldiers and devastated any human opposition. The following generations reproduced quickly and took Earth by sheer numbers. Resources grew slim. Rolling blackouts, burnt crops, and ravaged livestock forced man to retaliate. Thirty years passed before the first Enukara. A simple act of kindness from a human toward a dragon triggered the miracle. The human was blessed with the ability to heal another’s wound. The dragon bonded to him was granted immortality. The price for this gift was simple. The dragon’s life was bound to the human. If the human died, so would the dragon. The human could only heal another if the energy was transferred through the dragon. If he touched someone of his own accord, the transfer would drain him, leaving him lifeless. The dragon was forced to take on the role of guardian, forever protecting his human if he wanted to survive.

The greed of dragons and humans was underestimated. For if an Enukara’s life was taken by another, they would inherit the immortality blessed to the dragon. Both human and dragon could steal this gift. This discovery led to the death of thousands of Enukaras over the next sixty years. Most Enukaras were slain days after the blessing.

The dynamics changed when one dragon killed his own Enukara out of desperation. The power he inherited was unfathomable. This dragon hunted and killed every immortal who had slain an Enukara. He eliminated all remaining Enukaras and a semblance of peace ensued.

What was once considered a blessing is now feared. Dragons and humans have ceased all interaction to avoid enacting the Enukara.

There has been no Enukara for twenty years.

It has been one hundred and ten years since the first generation of dragons landed on Earth.

BOOK 1 AVAILABLE NOW in paperback and ebook

Dragons and Healers by Nina R Schluntz

A simple act of kindness from a human toward a dragon triggered the Enukara–giving the human the ability to heal the wounds of
others. The dragon bonded to him was granted immortality. The price for this gift was simple. The dragon’s life was bound to the
human.
The greed of dragons and humans was underestimated. For if an Enukara’s life was taken by another, they would inherit the
immortality blessed to the dragon. Both human and dragon could steal this gift. The slaughter of all Enukaras quickly ensued, until one
dragon killed his own Enukara.
The power he inherited was unfathomable. He hunted and killed every immortal who had slain an Enukara. A new Enukara emerges who challenges the mindset of the immortal dragon and the Enukara hopes to alter the fate of humanity, by showing the dragon how to love once again.

Amazon Kindle link paperback link

MLR Press direct link

 

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Forager, book review

I bought this book so long ago, I don’t even remember why. It was probably on sale for free or a discounted price. Either way, something about it appealed to me and it got added to my kindle collection. At long last, I can say I finally read it. (I’m pretty sure it sat waiting for about two years.)

I’ve read a few dystopian novels, mostly the classics that have been turned into movies. This book does take an original twist on things, as much as it can, anyway. The main character has been genetically enhanced, enabling him to see through metal and in the dark. Its explained that he has bat like vision, but really, he used it like superman. I’m sorry, but bats cannot see inside solid containers. So that bit of fiction must be taken for what it is.

The cultures created in this world, seem like the author is trying to make a point about today’s society, but I never grasped it. I’d almost say the author thought it would ironic to make what seems to be a European based city (Townhome) have the mindset of the ancient Japanese culture, and give the Japanese city a European culture. That aside, it’s much more likely there is some Russian/German cold war thing going on in the European city, and the other town was merely created to be its opposite.

The characters each have a distinct personality, which is good since there are several of them and if they weren’t easily distinguished from each other, it would get confusing. The main character seemingly never gets a break, and by the end of the novel, he’s nearly dead. At least the author kept it realistic and didn’t have the guy bouncing back in a superhero pace from his injuries. Even so, with a history of brain surgery and trauma to his head, he should be a vegetable by now. I’ll be interested to see how his recovery goes in the next novel.

You can tell this is written by a novice. There are typos, common writer beginner errors, ect, but it doesn’t take away from the story. It did get a bit annoying at how long it took the main character to figure out his mystery year of amnesia, mostly due to internal voice comments that were unneeded, but aside from that, I have no complaints on the overall story. *since I bought this two yrs ago, good chance the errors have been corrected by now

The book is a good read for those who enjoy dystopian novels. I’m a bit disappointed the Skel aren’t cannibals or zombies, but instead just another surviving civilization, but meh, it was still an enjoyable novel with plenty of twists and turns to keep the reader guessing.

Forager by Peter R Stone